MOTUL - MD

MOTUL – MD

+  R O U T E  0 1  ·  T O R I N O  – C H E S T E 

C R E D I T S:

WEBSITE: MOTORCYCLES DIARIES  
PROD.COMPANY: ANT PRODUCTIONS 
PRODUCER: PETER JEAN WILLEMS
PROD. ASSISTANT: FAUSTO MELERO 
DRONE PILOT : EROX FILMERFORCE
PHOTOGRAPHER : PETER JEAN WILLEMS
VIDEO  : SÉBASTIEN NUNES, JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
EDIT : JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
VFX & COLOUR : VISUALEX
SOUND DESIGNER: BSO

C R E D I T S:

WEBSITE: MOTORCYCLES DIARIES  
PROD.COMPANY: ANT PRODUCTIONS 
PRODUCER: PETER JEAN WILLEMS
PROD. ASSISTANT: FAUSTO MELERO 
DRONE PILOT : EROX FILMERFORCE
PHOTOGRAPHER : PETER JEAN WILLEMS
VIDEO  : SÉBASTIEN NUNES, JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
EDIT : JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
VFX & COLOUR : VISUALEX
SOUND DESIGNER: BSO

Ride from Torino to Valencia for a four-day trip crossing three countries and countless different landscapes. Hop on for a great ride to the 2016 Valencia MotoGP on 13 November.

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Be patient when leaving Torino and cruise on the highway with your internal compass pointing towards the Alps. After Pinerolo you’re ready for your first lesson from the School of Cornering: the Sestriere pass. Pause at Pregelato for a coffee at Caffe Des Alpes and discuss your podium prognostications with other GP nuts. You can’t miss the bar – Vale’s flag is hanging proudly in front of it.

On the way to Sestriere Pass!On the way to Sestriere Pass!Pause at Caffe Des Alpes and discuss your podium prognostications Pause at Caffe Des Alpes and discuss your podium prognosticationsSporty tyre on the wet? Not a problem with the Battlax S21
Sporty tyre on the wet? Not a problem with the Battlax S21
After the Sestriere pass you’ll enjoy a twisty road with a beautiful view of the valley on the French side – yes, you’re already at the border. Shortly after passing into France you’ll enter Briançon, home to some good arguments for a break. Climb up to the Citadel, for example. After refreshments, head in the direction of the Lac de Serre-Ponçon.Already passed the borderAlready passed the borderSome nice curves on the way to BriançonSome nice curves on the way to Briançon

The D954 from Savines-le-Lac to Saint-Vincent-les-Forts is very enjoyable: road tar is in great condition and the road hits you with curve after curve, left-right, left-right, uppercut, right hook. It’s a lot to take in and at some point you’ll be asking for a break from the ring. And you should take time out to enjoy the stunning view over the lake and the mountains beyond.Nice view on the Lac de Serre-Ponçon

Nice view on the Lac de Serre-PonçonThe Alps scenery around the Lac de Serre-PonçonThe Alps scenery around the Lac de Serre-Ponçon

Make sure you get your tyres back up to operating temperature in time for the D900, though. From Montclair onwards it’s 50km of non-stop fun: long and open curves complete with a topping of perfect tarmac.long and open curves complete with a topping of perfect tarmac

Long and open curves complete with a topping of perfect tarmacLook at thos curves....Look at thos curves….

No need to stop in Digne-les-Bains. You might get some traffic from Digne to the D4096 because everyone is driving to the Highway. The good news? You’re not going that way. After passing over that major artery you’ll enjoy the smooth and rural D12 to Forcalquier where you could spend the night.End of day somewhere before Forcalquier

End of day somewhere before Forcalquier

The Grand Hotel is a good option, cheap with decent rooms. Next you enter the Parc Naturel du Lubéron which means you’re surrounded by great nature with roads unobtrusively snaking through.On the way to Avignon

On the way to AvignonDon't hesitate to stop and enjoy the smell of wild thyme.Don’t hesitate to stop and enjoy the smell of wild thyme.Soon you’ll reach Avignon, which is a must-stop tourist experience unless you can’t handle crowded places. We took the must-have shot with the Saint-Bénézet bridge over the Rhônes.We couldn't resist the tourist shot

We couldn’t resist the tourist shot

After Avignon, ride towards Uzès and then find your way to Ganges. On the way to Saint-Maurice-Navacelles you’ll passe the Vis Canyon. If you have time you can do a 15-minute detour to the Grand Cirque de Navacelles. From here there’s a fantastic panoramic view of the Canyon.On the way to Saint-Maurice-Navacelles.

On the way to Saint-Maurice-Navacelles.Just passed the Canyon you can enjoy a few hairpinsJust passed the Canyon you can enjoy a few hairpins

Entering the Parc Régional du Haut-Languedoc you’ll discover smaller roads, sometimes a bit bumpy with dense vegetation crowding in on both sides.Small & twisty roads of the Haut-Languedoc

Small & twisty roads of the Haut-LanguedocA stop at the point of view Roc SuzadouA stop at the point of view Roc SuzadouYou’re surrounded by nature here, shown glimpses of picturesque hamlets and bombarded by new smells. No need for a nosepeg: this stuff will grow hairs on your chest. To avoid the traffic of Carcassone you’ll ride south on more small roads, passing through vineyards and villages. This area’s highlight happens at Vingrau where the road overlooks a whole valley full of vineyards, cut through with rocky outcrops.Near Vingrau, the road overlooks a whole valley full of vineyards.Near Vingrau, the road overlooks a whole valley full of vineyards.Open road that looks like a track.....Open road that looks like a track…..

Now it’s time to head to the sea! Pass through Perpignan and take the “Corniche” – it’s the panoramic coastal road between France and Spain. If you’re lucky there won’t be much traffic and you can enjoy a fantastic road with delicious curves and beautiful views of the Mediterranean sea. Past the Spanish border a whole different type of coastline begins. The landscape turns drier and villages look suddenly much more humble.La Corniche between France & SpainLa Corniche between France & SpainCurvelicious isn't it? Curvelicious isn’t it?

Riding south, you’ll soon reach Barcelona’s surroundings. Now the backcountry embraces you in large fields full of rich colours. After Igualada you’ll enter the quite small but not-to-miss Serra de Montsant where the locals have discovered the secret of how to make great wine. Oh, and the roads are also very fun to ride. The TP-7402 over this range of hills is like a small rollercoaster.We're not lost....we're exploring! We’re not lost….we’re exploring!

The more you go south, the more the temperature will rise. The higher the temperature, the closer you are to Valencia. Wherever you’ve booked your seats, we wish you’ll experience some inspirational, world-topping racing this November.At what time is the race again?Welcome to Cheste! Speed temple for the week-end!

Find the details of this trip and GPX file here.

+  R O U T E  0 2  ·  P A R I S  – C H E S T E 

C R E D I T S:

WEBSITE: MOTORCYCLES DIARIES  
PROD.COMPANY: ANT PRODUCTIONS 
PRODUCER: PETER JEAN WILLEMS
PROD. ASSISTANT: FAUSTO MELERO 
DRONE PILOT : EROX FILMERFORCE
PHOTOGRAPHER : PETER JEAN WILLEMS
VIDEO  : JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
EDIT : JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
VFX & COLOUR : VISUALEX
SOUND DESIGNER: BSO

C R E D I T S:

WEBSITE: MOTORCYCLES DIARIES  
PROD.COMPANY: ANT PRODUCTIONS 
PRODUCER: PETER JEAN WILLEMS
PROD. ASSISTANT: FAUSTO MELERO 
DRONE PILOT : EROX FILMERFORCE
PHOTOGRAPHER : PETER JEAN WILLEMS
VIDEO  : JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
EDIT : JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
VFX & COLOUR : VISUALEX
SOUND DESIGNER: BSO

How to earn your sangria the hard way! Motorcycle Diaries head honcho PJ leaps onto the Wrenchmonkees travel bike in Paris for a quick drink at his Spanish local bar.

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Where next for the intrepid WM70 and its hardy rider? A trip down to Cheste, of course! There were three routes I could take to Valencia, from Lisbon, Torino or Paris. The first was a simple 1100km, the second a slightly longer 1400, and the third? A 1617km epic. Which one did we decide to do on our soft-as-silk touring bike? Yes, that’s right. The longest. And when I say soft-as-silk, I really mean hard-as-nails. People say a Panigale is extreme, but maybe they should give the WM70 a go."Motul trip Paris-Valência" The route we chose (obviously in a fit of lunacy) didn’t include any highways at all, apart from leaving Paris and arriving in Valencia. But we also tried to avoid too many hairpins – they really don’t suit our bike. It was a tricky business getting the balance right! We budgeted six days for the jaunt, but we think you can do it quite easily in three: filming and taking pictures takes rather a lot of time, limiting us to between 250 and 300km per day."Motul trip Paris-Valência" Let’s jump straight into the action.

We leave from a chaotic central Paris, with traffic almost impossibly dense due to major tramway works. It’s a slow flow that takes us from the Boulevard Montpernasse onto the A6 and past Orly, but here we leave the bustling city behind us. We quickly cut through the suburbs on the N20 towards Arpajon. We have to watch our speed on this busy national road, as there are several speed cameras reminding you that of the Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité,there’s not much left of the first word."Motul roads to Cheste Paris to Valência" From the moment you turn off the National Road in Arpajon you really feel like you’ve left Paris far behind. Small villages and open fields lie before you and even if the road is not particularly exciting, the feeling you get in these first kilometres is that you’re finally on the move."Motul roads to Cheste Paris to Valência" Castles start to appear to the right and left as we close in on the Loire Valley. When we actually cross the Loire in Jargeau, we’re welcomed by a wonderful view over the river. Some sun-loving locals interrupt our frantic snapping and suggest an even better view they know of closer to Orleans. Only problem with that is a total lack of other bridges between here and there. We consider our options and look back at the straight and narrow Jargeau bridge. It’s then we understand why this small link between north and south looks like it’s home to an eternal traffic jam. We continue south, cross the A71 and end our first day in the wonderful Maison Le Mousseau. Here in the forests south of Orleans, we have our first glimpse of tomorrow’s beautiful scenery."Motul trip Paris-Valência" The next morning we leave the Loire on flowing forest roads and ride towards Vierzon. Where, you ask? Vierzon. We have travelled a lot in France but never to Vierzon. Now, apologies in advance to the people who live in Vierzon, but I can’t think of a single reason to go there. Apart from, that is, because Jacques Brel made it a title of one of his songs. Who, you ask? Jacques Brel. A Belgium singer well-known far outside the french speaking part of the world…"Motul roads to Cheste Paris to Valência" After Vierzon the road straight-lines towards the vineyards of Reuilly and our surroundings are suddenly completely different. So much so that a tree is abruptly a rare occurrence. It’s the vines that invade the landscape, lying like a patterned carpet over endless fields and surrounding countless anonymous towns. Why would someone want to live here? Maybe just for this view, the endless skies, or maybe for the Festival de Guitare of Issoudun. We spot an advert for the same Guitar Festival by the side of the road. Being a fan of guitars all my life I quickly scan the names on the poster. Top of the bill is John Scofield, a very big name in jazz. If he comes to play here, the festival really has something to offer. It’s on the last weekend in October this year. Maybe you could check it out on the way to the Valencia GP."Motul trip Paris-Valência" From Issoudun on there’s fields, fields, fields, fields, the headquarters of Louis Vuitton, fields, fields and fields. I always thought LV would be run from Paris, but no, it seems they prefer the silence and the nothingness of central France over the hectic big city."Motul trip Paris-Valência" We become accustomed to the area’s monotonous beauty and make quick progress on the D940 to Guéret, Thauron, Pontarion and Bourganeuf. A broken damper causes an unwanted midday break, but luckily the local carrossier is helpful and welds it back together. Back on the road, we dig deeper into the Limousin and although this green area of France is rather pretty, claustrophobic roads shut in by forest make us long for the grand vistas we’ve so recently left behind.

 After a night at Le Parc Des 4 Saisons in Corèze we’re refreshed and ready for more gorgeous curves. We enter the Dordogne where there’s more well-driven cars then anywhere else in France. I catch myself wondering whether Le Parc Des 4 Saisons is a front for an alien organisation that transported me to the UK in the middle of the night. From Argentat on we follow the mighty Dordogne for a while and drive through towns called Brivezac, Astillac, Fourmageac, Figeac – you get the idea."Motul roads to Cheste Paris to Valência" We have to enter the Lot region and pass the final -ac village (Gaillac, if you really want to know) before the landscape finally starts to offer something new. We honestly love trees here at Motorcycle Diaries, but the vineyards and fields do give you a little more variation. Now the roads are lined with maple, giving us an inspiring visual flow through the landscape. The Domaine Saint-Joly farmhouse puts us up for the night. Corageous Belgians turned it from a wreck into an exquisite B’n’B. We think it’s the morning view of the Pyrenees that made them fall in love with the place."Motul trip Paris-Valência" We’re running out of time. We must get to Valencia in three days, so the Pyrenees are attacked with fervour and we race between picturesque villages with a strong whiff of history about them. After our night in Lasbordes we head on through the Pays Cathare. Ruins of castles are everywhere to be seen. No time. We need to move on. Puivert, Ax Les Thermes, the French/Spanish border. Andorra is avoided: questions about the video and photography equipment we carry would set us back too much. And besides, we prefer riding roads instead of queuing at borders. We leave the mini-state tucked away in the mountains for next time."Motul trip Paris-Valência" We love Spain. For the food, the landscapes, the people, the culture, history and probably the most for the roads. We have a sneaking suspicion the director of the Spanish roadwork ministry is a major fan of motorcycling and therefore the flow of the roads are just perfect. The surfaces are racetrack-grade tarmac as well, where they’ve been rebuilt by European funding of course. Puigcerda, La Seu d’Urgell, Ponts, Belaguer… To go south passing through the Monegros is probably the most beautiful route, but we need to move on and we finally choose for the straighter roads to go around Lleida."Motul roads to Cheste Paris to Valência" However, we finally slow down. We leave Flix in the Delta del Ebre and choose the C12B as a shortcut towards Gandessa. Then we don’t just slow down – we actually stop. Not just to stop, either, but to turn right around and head back to Flix. Then back to the N420. Then back to Flix. Then the whole thing once more. And once more! I dare you to ride that road and not turn round to experience it again."Motul Trip Paris-Valência"We’re pretty exhausted when we arrive at the Hotel Consolacion in Monroyo, but who cares? This must be one of the best hotels in Spain. Really. No discussion allowed. Twelve rooms only, views that knock your socks off across the bedroom, food that tastes delicious. This is the first time we’ve managed to grab a few rooms in the hotel’s seven year history, and now we’ve been once we must come back.

"Motul Trip Paris-Valência"From Monroyo there’s an easy way to Valencia. You pass Morella and from there you take the N232 to the east and from there the motorway. That’s the easy route, but we want to enjoy the roads a little more. Today is a day stuffed full of contrasting roads. There’s the A1701 to Mosqueruela that has probably been under construction for ten years now, and due to limited funds is still not finished. This road will break you, except on a comfortable adventure bike. Where’s one of those when you want it? “Teruel Existe” was for long the slogan of this remote area, but hell we know it ‘exists’ just by the way our neck and wrists endure the bumps.

By the time we get to the blissful CV-20 from Olba to Onda we’re so broken we wonder why we chose to experience hell and heaven in the same day. Same counts for the road to Segorbe. Heaven, it is. Just be careful for the low sun at this time of the year. We take the motorway from Segorbe to Valencia, and our backs, necks and wrists breathe a sigh of relief. Some fast flowing corners bring us to the A7 and from there we head to the centre of Valencia. 1617km. Now where’s that sangria?

"Motul trip Paris-Valência"

Find the details of this trip and GPX file here.

+ R O U T E  0 3 ·  L I S B O N  – C H E S T E 

C R E D I T S:

WEBSITE: MOTORCYCLES DIARIES  
PROD.COMPANY: ANT PRODUCTIONS 
PRODUCER: PETER JEAN WILLEMS
PROD. ASSISTANT: FAUSTO MELERO 
DRONE PILOT : EROX FILMERFORCE
PHOTOGRAPHER : PETER JEAN WILLEMS
VIDEO  : PABLO GONZALEZ
EDIT : JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
VFX & COLOUR : VISUALEX
SOUND DESIGNER: BSO

C R E D I T S:

WEBSITE: MOTORCYCLES DIARIES  
PROD.COMPANY: ANT PRODUCTIONS 
PRODUCER: PETER JEAN WILLEMS
PROD. ASSISTANT: FAUSTO MELERO 
DRONE PILOT : EROX FILMERFORCE
PHOTOGRAPHER : PETER JEAN WILLEMS
VIDEO  : PABLO GONZALEZ
EDIT : JAVIER LAMAIGNÈRE
VFX & COLOUR : VISUALEX
SOUND DESIGNER: BSO

Trams, graffiti, good coffee, a beautiful sun, and the permanent presence of the River Tejo. Yes, Lisbon is a unique city!

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But right now I’m leaving it behind for Valencia, travelling on a trusty Yamaha Super Ténéré. The Lisbon-Valencia route is actually possible to do in one day, but only by ingesting a mouthful of mosquitoes and stopping only to refuel, and that is not the plan I have in mind.

"Motul Roads to Cheste: Lisbon to Valencia"

The 17 kilometre Vasco da Gama Bridge dismisses us as always, static and quiet. It’s as if it is wondering why I am leaving. I exit the highway right away and soon bike and rider are heading for the Coruche bridges. These iron constructions have been standing since 1933, small and endearing gems of engineering. I’ve been looking forward to riding them, and now the rich red girders are flashing past my Super Ténéré on both sides.

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

Almost without realizing it, I begin to cross the Portuguese countryside: vineyards, olive trees, rich blue skies. My route kisses the outskirts of Evora but I do not stop. My mind is set on Redondo, a small blue town that I visited as a child, and now imagine I had only dreamed of. And yet there it is, the whitewashed houses highlighted with a blue roof here, a blue wall there. It’s definitely blue, and in the afternoon sun, definitely hot as well!

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

The N373 brings me close to the border, and after crossing into Spain the heat just keeps on building. My destination is now Guadalupe, but heading straight there is all too easy (and boring). So I choose the EX-110 and turn into the Extremadura rangelands, mostly to the north of the A5 autovia. The rangelands are vast areas full of vineyards, cork oaks standing motionless in the heat, snorting bulls destined for the ring, and lazy Iberian pigs.

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

The Hospederia del Real Monasterio in Guadalupe’s medieval city is an ancient monastery turned hotel, with a beautiful inner courtyard. It’s blessed with a cool and refreshing ambience that both bike and rider take advantage of. If you visit, make sure you sample their locally-sourced jamon. It comes from the free-range black Iberian pigs this region is famous for.

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

The next morning, even the main roads to leave Guadalupe are amazing: fantastic asphalt and many curves to help you enjoy the grip. Who needs a highway to make progress? The bike takes me from one curve to the next as if we are both simply skimming through the forest landscape. I detour south to seek the Cijara swamp and there, without realising it, I land in La Mancha.

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

Today’s ride is longer than the first. My idea is to get to Alcalá del Júcar, almost in reach of Valencia, and the roads here in La Mancha allow me to move with a lot of speed and I’m flying through this landscape of vineyards and olive trees and windmills. When I pass through Consuegra and Mota del Cuervo, I cannot but think about Don Quixote. The straight path is the easiest, but also the most boring.

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

By mid-afternoon I enter the Las Hoces del Júcar region. It’s like a micro Grand Canyon in the middle of Spain, with roads that scribble down into valleys instead of up and over mountains. The route from Abengibre to Jorquera opens the door on a whole new type of landscape of white and green. Yes, because the walls of the canyon rocks are so white that they hurt my eyes and the river is still full of trees with all their leaves even in mid October. The entire B-5 from Jorquera to Alcalá del Júcar is pure poetry. But perhaps I am hallucinating, as the motorcycle tells me it’s a stifling 35 degrees Centigrade.

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

"Motul Roads to Cheste: Lisbon to Valência"

I get up early the next morning and catch the first sun rays tickling the CN-3201 north from Alcalá del Júcar. It’s a curvy climb that allows you to exit from the river canyon and back to the plains of La Mancha. The road that leads me to Cofrentes is quite simply a racetrack, but the N330 from Cofrentes to Requena is even better: curves and more curves with reddish mountain walls on both sides of the road.

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

When I reach Requena the highway A-3 can take me to Valencia in just 45 minutes. But, a highway? Let me check for a better route. Ah, Chera, of course! Another mad road – fast, with very good asphalt. I follow the CV395 towards Sot de Chera. And yet another surprise awaits me. This road is narrow and curvy with a good roadbed. The landscape is monumental; it reminds me of playing in Morocco’s high Atlas.

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

“Motul roads to Cheste” “Lisbon to Valência” “Road trip” “Motorcycles”

And so, little by little, sweaty and with a smile on my face, I arrive at Valencia. From the Atlantic to the Mediterranean, the bright lights in the harbour invite me to sit on a terrace, rip off my motorcycle gear and ask for a Paella.

"Motul roads to Cheste: Lisbon to Valencia"

Find the details of this trip and GPX file here.

+   A B O U T   M O T U L     

With core values such as being Brotherly, Passionate and Ingenious, values which move not only the body but also the soul, partners who share similar principles have always been important to Motul. In this vein, it has recently formed a partnership with the new online platform  www.motorcycle-diaries.com

 A site to “Discover. Be inspired. Plan and create. Share. Ride. Live”, Motorcycle Diaries is a border- crossing web platform created by motorcyclists for motorcyclists with the aim of becoming the first stop for every motorcyclist who wants to enjoy the best motorcycling-friendly roads and points of interest (POIs) in Europe.

As the exclusive Official Lubricant Partner of Motorcycle Diaries Motul will be involved in designing and sharing fully personalized Road Books\trips for, among other things, the most prestigious Motul-sponsored events such as MotoGP and WorldSBK rounds. Motul can then communicate these to its fans and make them available as a download.

With the largest database of yet-to-be-discovered roads and POIs in Europe, users can share to a like-minded community their most memorable roads and motorcycle adventures. The website is available in five languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish and German.

Strengthening Motul’s relationship with its loyal motorcycling market, MD.com will drop onto the road book maps all the European Motul service points, thus informing customers where they can stop and get Motul products\service.

 Additionally, some Motul content such as technical topics and ingenious stories will be integrated into the inspirational blog alongside articles from great travellers, even from outside Europe.

The Partnership is not only limited to online activation, and is being planned to go offline for some prestigious Motul events such as the final round of the 2016 MotoGP championship, the Gran Premio Motul de la Comunitat Valenciana from 11-13 November. On that occasion Motorcycle Diaries will encourage passionate motorcycle riders to move their wheels and their souls through the first official Motul routes which will be set from Paris, Frankfurt and Turin on the way to Valencia.

More Info: www.motul.com

+  A B O U T   M O T O R C Y C L E S   D I A R I E S   

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